1887
June
1887

AOA Transactions launches its first issue

In 1889, the first Transactions of the American Orthopedic Association, encompassing the 1887 and 1888 annual meetings, are published in accordance with the AOA by-laws. Held at the Academy of Medicine New York.

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June - 1887

AOA Transactions launches its first issue

1889
January
1889

Four Journal Title Changes in 33 Years

From 1889 to 1933, the title of The Journal evolved four times. Over the course of this period, The Journal became the official publication of the British Orthopaedic Association, American Orthopaedic Association, and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

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January - 1889

Four Journal Title Changes in 33 Years

In 1889, the first Transactions of the American Orthopedic Association, encompassing the 1887 and 1888 annual meetings, are published in accordance with AOA by-laws.

In 1903, the Transactions becomes The American Journal of Orthopedic Surgery.

In 1919, The American Journal of Orthopedics becomes the official publication of the British Orthopaedic Association, in addition to the American Orthopaedic Association, and the name is changed to The Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery.

In 1922, the title of The Journal is changed to The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery.

In 1933, The Journal becomes the official publication of the newly formed American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, although ownership is maintained by the American Orthopaedic Association.

January
1889

JBJS Known for High Editorial Standards

Since its inception, JBJS has stood above other medical journals for its editorial excellence. JBJS Editors-in-Chief and Deputy Editors have always been committed to the rigorous fact-checking, line editing, and manuscript reviews required of a leading scientific journal.

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January - 1889

JBJS Known for High Editorial Standards

January
1889

Data You Can Trust

It is the mission of JBJS, Inc. “to improve musculoskeletal health across the globe by delivering gold-standard information resources for clinicians, researchers, and orthopaedic care teams,” and this focus on delivering high-quality information is reflected in the meticulous copy-editing of every JBJS article.

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January - 1889

Data You Can Trust

November
1889

Evolution of JBJS Cover

The cover of The Journal has undergone not only design but title changes. Enjoy this journey through history.

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November - 1889

Evolution of JBJS Cover

1916
January
1916

Mark H. Rogers, MD, assumes role as Editor-in-Chief

Dr. Rogers served as the first Editor of The American Journal of Orthopedic Surgery, replacing a 3-man Editorial Committee. He served as an officer in the Medical Corps during his tenure, and resigned from his position in 1918.

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January - 1916

Mark H. Rogers, MD, assumes role as Editor-in-Chief

Click below to read the obituary for Dr. Rogers.
Mark Homer Rogers 1877-1941

1919
January
1919

H. Winnett Orr, MD, assumes role as Editor-in-Chief

Dr. Orr served as Editor-in-Chief from 1919 to 1921. During his tenure, the editorial offices were moved to Lincoln, NE, while the business offices remained in Boston.

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January - 1919

H. Winnett Orr, MD, assumes role as Editor-in-Chief

Click below to read the obituary for Dr. Orr, along with an editorial Dr. Orr wrote at the end of his tenure as Editor-in-Chief (1919-1921).
Hiram Winnett Orr 1877-1956
Editorial

1921
January
1921

Elliott G. Brackett, MD, assumes role as Editor-in-Chief

Deemed the “first Editor in the modern sense” by the AOA, Dr. Brackett set the tone for JBJS and turned it into the printed mainstay of the orthopaedic surgical community. During his tenure, subscriptions increased from 797 to over 3,300.

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January - 1921

Elliott G. Brackett, MD, assumes role as Editor-in-Chief

Click below to read the obituary for Dr. Brackett, along with 2 editorials Dr. Brackett wrote during his tenure as Editor-in-Chief (1921-1942).
Elliott Gray Brackett
Editorial Department. Foreword for the Year 1922
Tuberculosis in China

1926
January
1926

Women in JBJS

The role of women over time has truly evolved at the Journal.

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January - 1926

Women in JBJS

1931
April
1931

JBJS headquarters moves to Boston Medical Library

The Journal’s offices are moved from E. G. Brackett’s home to #8 The Fenway, Boston Medical Library.

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April - 1931

JBJS headquarters moves to Boston Medical Library

1937
January
1937

Tibia Vara. Osteochondrosis Deformans Tibiae

Blount. Tibia vara. Osteochondrosis deformans tibiae. JBJS. 1937 Jan;19(1):1.

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January - 1937

Tibia Vara. Osteochondrosis Deformans Tibiae

1941
April
1941

Posterior Protrusion of the Lumbar Intervertebral Discs

Barr and Mixter. Posterior protrusion of the lumbar intervertebral discs. JBJS. 1941 Apr; 23(2):444.

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April - 1941

Posterior Protrusion of the Lumbar Intervertebral Discs

1944
January
1944

William A. Rogers, MD, assumes role as Editor-in-Chief

Dr. Rogers coordinated a joint publication with The British Orthopaedic Association. Under his guidance, JBJS also became a nonprofit corporation with its Trustees appointed by The American Orthopaedic Association, its former owner, and The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

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January - 1944

William A. Rogers, MD, assumes role as Editor-in-Chief

Click below to read the obituary for Dr. Rogers, along with 2 editorials Dr. Rogers wrote during his tenure as Editor-in-Chief (1944-1958).
William Alexander Rogers, M. D. March 30, 1892 to April 4,1975
Editorial Announcement
Editorial

1948
January
1948

American JBJS and British JBJS Forge Long-Term Alliance

Shortly after WWII, leaders of the American and British volumes of JBJS developed friendships and created an alliance that extended for decades. They met socially on a regular basis – gathering on both sides of the pond – and developed a co-publication plan to reflect the international characters of both Journals.

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January - 1948

American JBJS and British JBJS Forge Long-Term Alliance

Initially, the co-publication plan devised by American Editor-in-Chief William A. Rogers and British Editor-in-Chief Sir Reginald Watson-Jones called for 8 volumes per year of the American volume and 4 volumes per year of the British volume . A subscription to both volumes could be purchased for $14, and subscriptions to each individual volume could be purchased for $10. Early negotiations around issue pricing, currency exchanges, and international postal regulations continued for years. However, both Journals largely worked harmoniously on these administrative details for the next several decades.

In January 1981, the Journals modified their publishing schedules in an effort to address the increasing number of high-quality papers submitted, reduce delays between article acceptance and publication, and further distinguish between the two Journals. Both agreed to increase the number of issues published to 9 per year. American issues would be referenced by month, while British issues would be referenced by number.

Throughout the first decade of the 21st century, the American and British Journals continued their affable working relationship. However, in 2011, the two Journals agreed to chart the courses of their individual futures by severing their formal ties. Each Journal was given complete control over its publication frequency and autonomy over its editorial and business strategy and brand.

1954
April
1954

Steve Tilton, Managing Editor, a ‘gentleman’s gentleman’

During his tenure from 1952-2000, Steve Tilton was a talented, dedicated and beloved contributor to JBJS.

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April - 1954

Steve Tilton, Managing Editor, a ‘gentleman’s gentleman’

Steve Tilton went to college at Colby, in Maine, and was a second-generation conscientious objector who served in the American Field Service in World War II, as his father had in World War I. Mr. Tilton drove an ambulance in North Africa, Italy, and Germany. After the war, it seems he had had his fill of excitement in motorized vehicles, and he never drove again. He taught English at Beirut University for a time, then came to Boston to attend BU for a graduate degree in English literature, but did not enjoy being back in school and did not stay long. He started at JBJS in 1954. He arrived on time at the office, lunched always at 11:30, read the Boston Globe at his desk after lunch, and never worked past closing time.

He was a homebody, and when asked what he planned to do on his spring vacation, he was known to mention that he might venture out to Harvard Square in Cambridge, around two miles from his home; however, he really enjoyed the bi-annual trips to England to meet with the British once those trips began in the 70’s or 80’s.

He retired from his role as Managing Editor in 1998 and worked part-time for JBJS as Manager of the Journal of Orthopaedic Research. He officially retired in 2000.

June
1954

JBJS Incorporated

The current, independent, non-profit corporation, The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Inc., is established and the AOA relinquishes ownership.

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June - 1954

JBJS Incorporated

1957
July
1957

The Self-Locking Metal Hip Prosthesis

Moore. The self-locking metal hip prosthesis. JBJS. 1957 Jul;39(4):811.

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July - 1957

The Self-Locking Metal Hip Prosthesis

1958
January
1958

Thornton Brown, MD, assumes role as Editor-in-Chief

Dr. Brown improved the rapidity of publication of articles by increasing the number of journal issues to 8 per year. Additionally, his meticulous insistence on accuracy and clarity set the highest standards for publishing in JBJS.

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January - 1958

Thornton Brown, MD, assumes role as Editor-in-Chief

Click below to read the obituary for Dr. Brown, along with an editorial Dr. Brown wrote during his tenure as Editor-in-Chief (1958-1978).
Thornton Brown, M.D., 1913-2000
Editorial

June
1958

The Treatment of Certain Cervical-Spine Disorders by Anterior

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June - 1958

The Treatment of Certain Cervical-Spine Disorders by Anterior

1963
March
1963

Congenital Club Foot: The Results of Treatment

Ponseti and Smoley. Congenital club foot: the results of treatment. JBJS. 1963 Mar;45(2):261.

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March - 1963

Congenital Club Foot: The Results of Treatment

April
1963

Injuries Involving the Epiphyseal Plate

Salter and Harris. Injuries involving the epiphyseal plate. JBJS. 1963 Apr;45(3):587.

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April - 1963

Injuries Involving the Epiphyseal Plate

1965
October
1965

JBJS headquarters moves to Countway Library

The main offices of JBJS are moved to Harvard’s Countway Medical Library.

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October - 1965

JBJS headquarters moves to Countway Library

1966
March
1966

The Carpal-Tunnel Syndrome. Seventeen Years’ Experience

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March - 1966

The Carpal-Tunnel Syndrome. Seventeen Years’ Experience

1968
March
1968

Rotatory Instability of the Knee: Its Pathogenesis and…

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March - 1968

Rotatory Instability of the Knee: Its Pathogenesis and…

1969
June
1969
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June - 1969

Traumatic Arthritis of the Hip After Dislocation and…

December
1969

JBJS begins publishing The Annual Bibliography of Orthopaedic Surgery

The Annual Bibliography of Orthopaedic Surgery is an index of articles that have significant value to orthopaedic surgeons. Articles are chosen by an Advisory Committee made up of the American Orthopaedic Association and JBJS.

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December - 1969

JBJS begins publishing The Annual Bibliography of Orthopaedic Surgery

1971
January
1971

Publishing Was a Slow, Manual Process

Before the widespread use of PCs, the JBJS publication process involved manually checking references, pen-and-ink editing, re-typing manuscripts, cutting-and-pasting layouts, and snail-mailing submissions, review copies, and proofs.

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January - 1971

Publishing Was a Slow, Manual Process

“Until the late 1970s, the process of publishing an issue of JBJS and getting it into the hands of subscribers was a laborious one.

After acceptance, each manuscript underwent a 3-day process of meticulous line editing, manual reference checking, and retyping of the entire manuscript.

The printing process was also time-consuming. Once assigned, articles were shipped to the printer, where they were rekeyed and typeset before being sent back to JBJS for proofreading. The hard-copy proof was then read, corrected, and shipped back to the printer to create the final copy, which was again proofread to make sure that all changes had been incorporated correctly.

Layout artists then proceeded to cut up the printed pages and lay them out onto sheets to mimic the final appearance in the full printed Journal before shipping the pages back to the printer, who finalized proofs for final proofreading before printing the full Journal.”

1972
January
1972

Anterior Acromioplasty for Chronic Impingement Syndrome

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January - 1972

Anterior Acromioplasty for Chronic Impingement Syndrome

1973
January
1973

Mady Tissenbaum

Mady Tissenbaum’s work over the course of her >40-year tenure is largely responsible for making JBJS what it is today: the premier orthopaedic journal in the world.

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January - 1973

Mady Tissenbaum

1975
April
1975

Thornton Brown Brings Sophisticated Structure to Articles

Appointed in 1958, Dr. Brown was a humble leader who set a high standard for editorial excellence and was devoted to the communication of scientific material. During his tenure as Editor-in-Chief, he inculcated the controlled article structure that remains today.

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April - 1975

Thornton Brown Brings Sophisticated Structure to Articles

1976
June
1976

Prevention of Infection in the Treatment of 125 Open Fractures

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June - 1976

Prevention of Infection in the Treatment of 125 Open Fractures

1977
September
1977

Orthopaedic Transactions Expands Audience for Meeting Abstracts

JBJS launched Orthopaedic Transactions to recognize the significant contributions of leading orthopaedic researchers and to make their articles available to a larger audience of peers who were not able to attend specialty conferences in person.

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September - 1977

Orthopaedic Transactions Expands Audience for Meeting Abstracts

October
1977

The Compressive Behavior of Bone as a Two-Phase Porous Structure

Carter and Hayes. The compressive behavior of bone as a two-phase porous structure. JBJS. 1977 Oct;59(7):954.

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October - 1977

The Compressive Behavior of Bone as a Two-Phase Porous Structure

1978
January
1978

The Bankart Procedure. A Long-Term End-Result Study

Rowe et al. The Bankart procedure. A long-term end-result study. JBJS. 1978 Jan;60(1):1.

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January - 1978

The Bankart Procedure. A Long-Term End-Result Study

1979
January
1979

Paul Curtiss Chips Away at Time to Publication

Under Dr. Curtiss, JBJS began to decrease the length of time from submission to publication. He had a lighter hand during line editing than his predecessors and started to accelerate deadlines for author responses to reviewer comments and corrected manuscripts.

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January - 1979

Paul Curtiss Chips Away at Time to Publication

January
1979

Paul H. Curtiss Jr., MD, assumes role as Editor-in-Chief

Dr. Curtiss established the Current Concepts Reviews and Letters to the Editor sections during his tenure and increased publication to 9 issues per year. He was the first medical editor to suggest that authors disclose potential conflicts of interest.

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January - 1979

Paul H. Curtiss Jr., MD, assumes role as Editor-in-Chief

Click below to read the obituary for Dr. Curtiss, along with an editorial Dr. Curtiss wrote during his tenure as Editor-in-Chief (1979-1985).
Paul H. Curtiss Jr., MD 1920-2007
Editorial Announcement

1980
January
1980

JBJS Launches “Current Concept Reviews”

To meet orthopaedists’ demand for review articles, JBJS moved from occasional review articles to regularly published articles that were planned in advance and edited in a more systematic way, resulting in a regular, high-quality special section.

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January - 1980

JBJS Launches “Current Concept Reviews”

July
1980

Arthroscopy in Acute Traumatic Hemarthrosis of the Knee

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July - 1980

Arthroscopy in Acute Traumatic Hemarthrosis of the Knee

1984
March
1984

Biomechanical Analysis of Human Ligament Grafts

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March - 1984

Biomechanical Analysis of Human Ligament Grafts

April
1984

Closed Intramedullary Nailing of Femoral Fractures

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April - 1984

Closed Intramedullary Nailing of Femoral Fractures

1985
September
1985

Marketing JBJS Excellence

JBJS strategically expanded its marketing efforts to increase its reach to orthopaedists by exhibiting and speaking at global conferences, joining scientific publishing societies, increasing its outreach to authors and subscribers, and supporting these efforts with a dedicated Advertising department.

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September - 1985

Marketing JBJS Excellence

JBJS leadership understood that its rich legacy as a niche, scholarly medical journal would need a fresh infusion of marketing savvy in order to continue its success into the next millennium.

Under Henry Cowell’s tenure, The Journal expanded its marketing outreach by attending and exhibiting at meetings and conferences both nationally and internationally.

Under Jim Heckman’s tenure, The Journal continued to invest in marketing, with the hiring of a dedicated Marketing Director and expanded marketing staff, increased participation in conferences with formal marketing strategies and a professionally designed exhibit booth, and outreach to orthopaedists through direct mail and other advertising channels.

1986
January
1986

Henry R. Cowell, MD, PhD, assumes role as Editor-in-Chief

Dr. Cowell brought JBJS into the modern age of electronic publishing. He replaced typewriters with computers, started the JBJS website and put its content on CD-ROMs, introduced desktop publishing, and instituted a computerized database for article tracking.

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January - 1986

January
1986

JBJS Modernizes and Enhances Digital Presence

Under the tenure of Dr. Cowell, JBJS started using PCs and investing in technology to better meet the needs of modern subscribers. Some advances, such as an early OCR scanner that spared copy editors the task of retyping manuscripts, were designed to improve operations. Others, such as the JBJS.org web site, expanded the ways in which subscribers could interact with the Journal.

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January - 1986

JBJS Modernizes and Enhances Digital Presence

In 1992, JBJS was among the first medical journals to produce a full-text version on CD-ROM, and, in 1996, The Journal launched a basic web site. Like most web sites at the time, it was a work in progress and was intended to answer common reader questions relating to Editorial, Subscriptions, and Advertising.

By the end of the 1990s, the full text and illustrations of JBJS for 1996-1998 became available online, and the site was updated monthly to mirror the CD-ROM subscription with Medline abstracts of articles listed in the references. The site also featured fuzzy-logic text searching, relevance-ranked document retrieval, and full indexing of all important text words. Links within the text to images, charts, graphs, tables, and references helped users find information rapidly.

Online access to full-text versions was available to all users for a trial period, after which non-subscribers were only able to view tables of contents and abstracts. In 1999, all visitors to the site were given the ability to download specific articles for a fee.

These advances were designed to provide information to readers in a readily available form and timely fashion, helping to cement The Journal’s reputation as a leader in orthopaedic education.

March
1986

JBJS Emerges as an International Powerhouse

During Dr. Cowell’s tenure, JBJS increased its base of international subscribers and authors by reaching out to a global audience, participating in international conferences and workshops, and expanding its marketing to orthopaedists worldwide.

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March - 1986

JBJS Emerges as an International Powerhouse

During the mid-1980s, JBJS found new footing – growing from a niche scholarly journal to a thriving global corporation under the leadership of Henry Cowell. He was the first Editor-in-Chief to travel extensively around the globe, meeting with a variety of organizations, including the AAOS and the European Federation of National Associations of Orthopaedics and Traumatology (EFORT).

To help increase international submission and acceptance rates, he regularly delivered lectures and conducted workshops designed to help orthopaedists understand how to write for JBJS as well as how the review and editing processes work.

He also expanded Deputy Editor workshops internationally to extend the review and editing processes to professionals worldwide.
These initiatives were well-received and effective in expanding the Journal’s visibility among international authors and subscribers.

July
1986

JBJS Appoints First Chief Executive Officer

When Henry Cowell became Editor-in-Chief, he also became JBJS’s first CEO, a role that included financial responsibility and ushered in a new age as a thriving corporation and international powerhouse in a highly competitive market.

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July - 1986

JBJS Appoints First Chief Executive Officer

October
1986

Enhanced Roles for Deputy Editors and Reviewers

Under Henry Cowell, Deputy Editor workshops included reviewers and were held around the country and globe, at greater frequency, to improve communication, feedback, and training. He also educated orthopaedists on how to effectively critique manuscripts.

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October - 1986

Enhanced Roles for Deputy Editors and Reviewers

The Deputy Editor workshop became a crucial component of publishing JBJS during Henry Cowell’s leadership as Editor-in-Chief.

During these workshops, Deputy Editors would gather together with reviewers, Associate Editors, and others to resolve disagreements around reviewers’ grades.

Dr. Cowell was intent on increasing the frequency of these workshops and using them to extend The Journal’s outreach among key stakeholders and enhance education on how to effectively critique manuscripts, helping to raise the bar for editorial excellence.

Dr. Cowell also prioritized continuing education for JBJS staff, whether that meant training on new computer technologies or supporting senior staff membership in professional societies and participation in conferences.

December
1986

Limb-Salvage Treatment Versus Amputation for Osteosarcoma

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December - 1986

Limb-Salvage Treatment Versus Amputation for Osteosarcoma

1988
January
1988

JBJS increases the number of issues per year to ten

The Journal, faced with the concern that an increasing number of high-quality manuscripts were being submitted each year and aware of the fact that the acceptance of more papers for publication had led to a longer interval between acceptance and publication, decided to increase the number of issues published each year.

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January - 1988

JBJS increases the number of issues per year to ten

JBJS Editorial Staff and Trustees recognized that to support the JBJS mission, the organization must encourage authors to submit their best material. For authors to do so, it was imperative that they be comfortable with the review process, which should follow stringent standards in an author-friendly way.

Some authors felt that an author’s perceived status—based on their institution and location—might affect whether a manuscript was rejected or accepted. While no such bias was proven, JBJS believed that even the perception of bias should be eliminated and therefore instituted a blind peer review process.

Starting in July 1994, manuscripts were required to be submitted with two cover sheets: one that contained author names and contact information and a second to be sent to reviewers with only the manuscript title.

1990
March
1990

Abnormal Magnetic-Resonance Scans of the Lumbar Spine in…

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March - 1990

Abnormal Magnetic-Resonance Scans of the Lumbar Spine in…

1992
February
1992

JBJS electronic format (CD)

The Journal is available for the first time in electronic format, a quarterly compact disc.

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February - 1992

JBJS electronic format (CD)

July
1992

Periprosthetic Bone Loss in THA. Polyethylene Wear Debris

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July - 1992

Periprosthetic Bone Loss in THA. Polyethylene Wear Debris

1993
June
1993

Due to organizational growth, JBJS moves headquarters to Needham

The main offices are moved to 20 Pickering Street, Needham which remains the current location.

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June - 1993

Due to organizational growth, JBJS moves headquarters to Needham

September
1993

JBJS Supports American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

While the AAOS had its own Journal, JBJS supported the newly formed organization and committed to publishing the Academy’s leading instructional course lectures and annual presidential address. This allowed JBJS to expand its visibility with AAOS members worldwide over 24 years until ending the program in February 2017.

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September - 1993

JBJS Supports American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons

1994
January
1994

Excellence in Peer Review

The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery has long been committed to serving the orthopaedic community and enhancing patient care by publishing high-quality information.

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January - 1994

Excellence in Peer Review

July
1994

Instituting Blinded Peer Review

Following an intrinsic belief that the perception of bias should be eliminated, JBJS began a blind peer review process that continues today. Manuscripts that clearly identify authors are returned without review.

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July - 1994

Instituting Blinded Peer Review

JBJS Editorial Staff and Trustees recognized that to support the JBJS mission, the Journal must encourage authors to submit their best material. For authors to do so, it was imperative that they be comfortable with the review process, which should follow stringent standards in an author-friendly way.

Some authors felt that an author’s perceived status—based on their institution and location—might affect whether a manuscript was rejected or accepted. While no such bias was proven, the Journal believed that even the perception of bias should be eliminated and therefore instituted a blind peer review process.

Starting in July 1994, manuscripts were required to be submitted with two cover sheets: one that contained author names and contact information and a second to be sent to reviewers with only the manuscript title.

1995
March
1995

Non-Traumatic Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head

Mont and Hungerford. Non-traumatic avascular necrosis of the femoral head. JBJS. 1995 Mar;77(3):459.

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March - 1995

Non-Traumatic Avascular Necrosis of the Femoral Head

July
1995

The Value of Tip-Apex Distance in Predicting Failure of Fixation

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July - 1995

The Value of Tip-Apex Distance in Predicting Failure of Fixation

1997
May
1997

Evolution of JBJS Digital Logos

JBJS design has evolved over the years, reflecting our commitment to change as well as our digital presence.

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May - 1997

Evolution of JBJS Digital Logos

1998
January
1998

JBJS Becomes Official Scientific Journal of AAOS

As the Official Scientific Journal of AAOS, JBJS expanded its international reach and presence among AAOS members and orthopaedists worldwide.

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January - 1998

JBJS Becomes Official Scientific Journal of AAOS

The Deputy Editor workshop became a crucial component of publishing JBJS during Henry Cowell’s leadership as Editor-in-Chief.

During these workshops, Deputy Editors would gather together with reviewers, Associate Editors, and others to resolve disagreements around reviewers’ grades.

Dr. Cowell was intent on increasing the frequency of these workshops and using them to extend the Journal’s outreach among key stakeholders and enhance education on how to effectively critique manuscripts, helping to raise the bar for editorial excellence.

Dr. Cowell also prioritized continuing education for Journal staff, whether that meant training on new computer technologies or supporting senior staff membership in professional societies and participation in conferences.

1999
July
1999

Evolution of the JBJS website

Explore the way-back machine as we look at how JBJS evolved with the web, starting with the first website in 2001, being one of the first journals on the web.

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July - 1999

Evolution of the JBJS website

2000
January
2000

Michael W. Chapman, MD, Chairman of the Board, 2000-01

Dr. Chapman approved the OREF-JBJS Journal Club, teamed with HighWire Press for the electronic version of JBJS, and created a CD-ROM version of JBJS. The historic member benefit contract between the AAOS and JBJS was agreed to in 2001.

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January - 2000

Michael W. Chapman, MD, Chairman of the Board, 2000-01

Dr. Chapman oversaw additional high-level business developments. The Board clarified that JBJS would retain full copyright on all published content, and that it would not grant that copyright to others. Prior to this, exceptions for certain institutions were allowed.

Also, the Trustees agreed that the cover of The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery would reflect its origins from the American Orthopaedic Association.

January
2000

Jim Heckman Recognized for Energy and Determination

Dr. Heckman brought enormous energy and fierce determination to his role as Editor-in-Chief. He encouraged the publication of unbiased research and routine reviews by statisticians. He also intensified efforts to network with other journals with an eye toward best and ethical publishing practices.

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January - 2000

Jim Heckman Recognized for Energy and Determination

January
2000

James D. Heckman, MD, assumes role as Editor-in-Chief

Dr. Heckman spearheaded several important initiatives, including a focus on evidence-based medicine, shortening the time from submission to publication, advancing the integration of print and electronic publication, and expanding the types of articles (Orthopaedic Forum, Ethics in Practice, Evidence-Based Orthopaedics).

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January - 2000

James D. Heckman, MD, assumes role as Editor-in-Chief

Click on read more for links to editorials written by Dr. Heckman during his tenure as Editor-in-Chief (2000-2009).

June
2000

JBJS Offered as AAOS Member Benefit

JBJS‘s established position as the highest-quality journal in the field and required reading among orthopaedists was the impetus behind this program to make the Journal readily available to every orthopaedist in America. This member benefit ended in February 2017.

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June - 2000

JBJS Offered as AAOS Member Benefit

October
2000

JBJS Partners with HighWire Press

The move to a new host increased the sophistication of JBJS’s offerings through a modern web presence seen here, which improved search, indexing, and reference functions. JBJS also benefited from alliances with other HighWire journals.

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October - 2000

JBJS Partners with HighWire Press

In October 2000, Dr. Heckman, Editor-in-Chief , and Dr. Poss, Deputy Editor for Electronic Media, penned a JBJS editorial in which they noted that “the rapid advent of the electronic age has shaken the foundations of the publishing industry and left all in a quandary, trying to identify strategies to survive and perhaps to thrive in a new paradigm where the dissemination of bountiful information is cheap, while the delivery of high-quality, peer-reviewed knowledge remains expensive.”

In an effort to meet the needs of this new age of scientific publishing and advance the Journal’s mission of presenting the most important new scientific knowledge to the orthopaedic community, JBJS partnered with HighWire Press of Stanford University to develop a new interactive website.

The new site enhanced the value of the Journal’s printed articles with the audio, video, and text capabilities of the Internet and allowed the Journal to supplement its monthly printed publication with real-time resources. The upgraded site featured:

  • Customized home page by orthopaedic subspecialty interest.
  • Capability to build unique subject files by collating searches from multiple sources.
  • Article enhancements, including commentaries and supplementary materials.
  • Search capabilities and the ability to download and print articles.
  • Online reviews of electronic educational products.
2001
January
2001

New JBJS Features Facilitate Education

Under Dr. Heckman’s tenure as Editor-in-Chief, JBJS enhanced the level of evidence published with clinical articles and implemented structured abstracts. During this time, JBJS also launched several new features, including “Orthopaedic Forum,” “Ethics in Practice,” “Evidence-Based Orthopaedics,” and “Specialty Update.”

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January - 2001

New JBJS Features Facilitate Education

The “Orthopaedic Forum” is designed to be a place where intriguing, provocative, or controversial new ideas are presented and discussed. It includes topics on health care policy, orthopaedic practice, and ethics, and presents interesting symposia from national orthopaedic meetings.

“Ethics in Practice” articles feature topics of benefit to both physicians and patients alike. Typically, each article includes a brief clinical vignette followed by a discussion of the ethical issues that were encountered and how they were addressed.

“Evidence-Based Orthopaedics” articles, published quarterly, feature summaries of the main points of 3 recent studies from the orthopaedic literature, followed by commentaries highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of each study from an evidence-based perspective.

Specialty Update” articles, published monthly, provide a comprehensive overview of the recent literature pertaining to major subspecialties in the field of orthopaedics.

March
2001

JBJS Journal-Based CME Activities

JBJS CME products were created with busy orthopaedic surgeons in mind. Meeting CME requirements is a yearly task, and JBJS CME products help surgeons meet those requirements in a timely manner that works best with their schedule—anytime, anywhere.

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March - 2001

JBJS Journal-Based CME Activities

JBJS offers Monthly, Quarterly, and Subspecialty/Topic-Specific Exams for surgeons to meet their CME and SAE requirements. Exams are released on a steady schedule, and are accessible at home, in the office, or on-the-go. Surgeons earn credits by completing exams based on recent peer-reviewed articles published in The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery.

Monthly exams contain 33-34 questions and are worth 5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™, making them the perfect options for surgeons looking for smaller amounts to complete steadily throughout the year.

Quarterly exams contain 100 questions and are worth 10 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Published every quarter, these time-intensive exams are great for surgeons who like to claim larger amounts of CME less frequently throughout the year.

Subspecialty- and Topic-specific exams—like the Pain Management CME and Clinical Summaries CME assessments—offer surgeons the opportunity to earn their credits while exploring topics tailored to their interests. These exams are worth a range of credits, and allow surgeons to build their knowledge while earning CME in areas in which they are most interested.

The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Inc. is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

April
2001

JBJS Offers Continuing Medical Education

JBJS diversified its business and expanded its offerings by introducing the ability to earn CME credits, with examination questions based on JBJS content, at a time when recertification was becoming increasingly important in the orthopaedic community.

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April - 2001

JBJS Offers Continuing Medical Education

2002
January
2002

Walter B. Greene, MD, Chairman of the Board, 2002

Dr. Greene appointed and promoted James Heckman as Editor-in-Chief and Mady Tissenbaum as the General Manager of JBJS, Inc. On December 31, 2002, the Board of Trustees froze the Defined Benefit Plan.

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January - 2002

Walter B. Greene, MD, Chairman of the Board, 2002

Also under Dr. Greene’s guidance, the agreement to make JBJS a member benefit of the AAOS was officially implemented. After a long-standing relationship, the separation of the American and British versions of The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery began.

During his tenure, Dr. Greene reaffirmed the ongoing mission of JBJS for excellence in scientific publishing and encouraged the discussion of other alternative educational opportunities.

2003
January
2003

Bernard F. Morrey, MD, Chairman of the Board, 2003

Dr. Morrey approved Surgical Techniques as a supplement to The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery.

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January - 2003

Bernard F. Morrey, MD, Chairman of the Board, 2003

2004
January
2004

James R. Urbaniak, MD, Chairman of the Board, 2004-05

Dr. Urbaniak determined that JBJS should create a business plan for a commercially viable, online, electronic strategy. The member benefit agreement between the AAOS and JBJS was also revised and extended through 2011.

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January - 2004

James R. Urbaniak, MD, Chairman of the Board, 2004-05

2005
January
2005

Metal-on-Metal Bearings and Hypersensitivity in Patients with…

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January - 2005

Metal-on-Metal Bearings and Hypersensitivity in Patients with…

2006
January
2006

Jesse C. DeLee, MD, Chairman of the Board, 2006

Dr. DeLee approved free subscriptions for all PGY2 through PGY5 residents and expanded the Journal Club program with the OREF for 2007 and 2008.

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January - 2006

Jesse C. DeLee, MD, Chairman of the Board, 2006

Dr. DeLee also initiated succession planning for the Editor role for 2009. The Board of Trustees had previously decided to pursue a position that combined the Editor role with a new CEO role.

March
2006

JBJS Solidifies Digital Presence

JBJS’s digital transformation accelerated with the launch of an interactive web site housed by HighWire Press, which indexed the entire JBJS archive. The processes for submissions and peer review were moved online as well, decreasing time from submission to publication.

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March - 2006

JBJS Solidifies Digital Presence

JBJS started to move into the digital age in the 1980s, when staff began to use desktop computers and early-stage digital tools.

In 1996, The Journal debuted its first web page, which initially featured only the current issue’s table of contents. JBJS also began building an extensive CD/DVD library in the 1990s.

By the mid-2000s, JBJS became more digitally sophisticated. The Journal was now housed on HighWire Press, a more interactive site that offered new ways to view and search for articles going back to 1889.

The article submission and peer review processes also moved online, which helped to eliminate the need for laborious and time-consuming cut-and-paste work and decrease the time between submission and publication.

April
2006

Lumbar Disc Disorders and Low-Back Pain: Socioeconomic Factors

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April - 2006

Lumbar Disc Disorders and Low-Back Pain: Socioeconomic Factors

2007
October
2007

A Randomized Trial Comparing Autologous Chondrocyte…

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October - 2007

A Randomized Trial Comparing Autologous Chondrocyte…